Notes: Evidence of Indo-European words or Proto-IE words in the Japanese language?

 Paradoxically, linguists separately postulate that both LinA and the Japonic languages belong to the Altaic family of IE languages.  Consequently, many linguists may be surprised about the prevalence of Japanese words with IE concordances.  This list is intended to demonstrate that the Japanese concordances with Indo-European is greater than linguists have supposed.  Consider, especially, the concordances between Japanese and Greek.  There is growing evidence, especially among LinB tablets, that Greek and Japanese are related languages.
meotis meochi
Nama name in Iranic languages

Namae name in Japanese
Wr.umin.jp swimming saft

Bey (Ottoman TurkishبكBegBeğ) is a title for chieftain, traditionally applied to the leaders of small tribal groups. According to some sources, the word “Bey” is of Turkish language[1][2][3] In historical accounts, many Turkish, other Turkic and Persian leaders are titledBeyBegBekBaiBayBajBaig or Beigh. They are all the same word with the simple meaning of “lord”. The regions or provinces where beys ruled or which they administered were called beylik, roughly meaning “emirate” or “principality” in the first case, “province” or “governorate” in the second (the equivalent of duchy in Europe).

The Western naval rank “admiral” comes from the Arabic naval title amir al-bahrgeneral at sea, which has been used for naval commanders and occasionally the Ministers of Marine.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siddhaṃ_alphabet

Many of the Buddhist texts which were taken to China along the Silk Road were written using a version of the Siddhaṃ script. This continued to evolve, and minor variations are seen across time, and in different regions. Importantly it was used for transmitting the Buddhisttantra texts. At the time it was considered important to preserve the pronunciation of mantras, and Chinese was not suitable for writing the sounds of Sanskrit. This led to the retention of the Siddhaṃ Script in East Asia. The practice of writing using Siddhaṃ survived in East Asia where Tantric Buddhism persisted.

Kūkai introduced the Siddhaṃ script to Japan when he returned from China in 806, where he studied Sanskrit with Nalanda-trained monks including one known as Prajñā. By the time Kūkai learned this script, the trading and pilgrimage routes over land to India, were closed by the expanding Islamic empire of the Abbasids.

In Japan the writing of mantras and copying of Sutras using the Siddhaṃ script is still practiced in the esoteric Buddhist schools of Shingon and Tendai as well as in the syncretic sect of Shugendō. The characters are known as shittan (悉曇?) or bonji (梵字?, Chinese:Fánzi). The Taisho edition of the Chinese Tripiṭaka preserves the Siddhaṃ characters for most mantras, and Korean Buddhists still write seed syllables in a modified form of Siddhaṃ. A recent innovation is the writing of Japanese language slogans on T-shirts using Bonji. Japanese Siddhaṃ has evolved from the original script used to write sūtras and is now somewhat different from the ancient script.

 

On Tuesday, August 6, 2013, Aileen Kawagoe wrote:

Nama name in Iranic languages

Namae name in Japanese
Wr.umin.jp swimming saft

Bey (Ottoman TurkishبكBegBeğ) is a title for chieftain, traditionally applied to the leaders of small tribal groups. According to some sources, the word “Bey” is of Turkish language[1][2][3] In historical accounts, many Turkish, other Turkic and Persian leaders are titledBeyBegBekBaiBayBajBaig or Beigh. They are all the same word with the simple meaning of “lord”. The regions or provinces where beys ruled or which they administered were called beylik, roughly meaning “emirate” or “principality” in the first case, “province” or “governorate” in the second (the equivalent of duchy in Europe).

YHavana Iona yona rajas

Ame-no~ Amir / Heavenly /Celestial

In certain decimally-organized Muslim armies, Amir was an officer rank. For example, in Mughal India Amirs commanded 1000 horsemen (divided into ten units, each under a Sipah salar), ten of them under one Malik. In the imperial army of Qajar Persia:

  • Amir-i-Nuyan,
  • Amir Panj, “Commander of 5,000”
  • Amir-i-Tuman, “Commander of 10,000”
  • Amir ul-Umara, “Amir of Amirs” (cfr. supra) or ‘Commander of Commanders’

In the former Kingdom of AfghanistanAmir-i-Kabir was a title meaning “great prince” or “great commander.”

SANA (現実)

(n.) reality, truth

Compare

  • sanity < M.Fr. sanité  “health,” < L. sanitas “health, sanity,” < sanus  “healthy, sane
  • sense < O.Fr. sens < L. sensus “perception, feeling “
  • Goth sunja  “truth”
  • O.E. soþ  “true,” originally *sonþ– < P.Gmc. *santhaz
  • O.H.G. sand “true”
  • O.N sannr “true”

Entry added on 02 Jun 2012
Updated on 05 Jun 2012

 

DAIZA (台座)

(n.) pedestal

Compare

  • dais < Anglo-French deis < O. Fr. dais ”platform, table”

Entry added on 30 Jul 2013
_________________________________________________________________Obviously, the NW and the clearly non-IA tribes limited to the RV should be

regarded separately. Here we find Kamboja (AV,PS+), cf. OP. Kambujīya ‘Cambyses’ (as

satrap of Kamboja, like ‘Prince of Wales, Dauphin’: Dauphinée?); however, cf. Gr.

Ambautai, a tribe in the Hindukush area, with the typical Saka suffix -tai (Sauroma-tai,

etc.).107 A

 

http://archiv.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/savifadok/112/1/AryanandnonAryan_1999.pdf

DANWA (談話)

DA-NWA  ► (KN Gg 701)  This is from Chinese kanji

(n.)  conversation, discourse, talk

Compare

  • Gr. δήνεα (denea)  “counsels, plans”

Notes:  The LinB shift to the Greek δήνεα suggests that the original word may have been DA-NA-WA, or perhaps DA-NE-WA, before its weakening to DA-NWA.

Entry added on 09 Nov 2012

KUMO (雲)

(n.) cloud

Compare

  • cumulus  “a heap” < L. cumulus  “a heap, a mass, a pile; surplus”

Notes: Cumulus as “a rounded mass of clouds” is attested in 1803.  Note that Japanese kumo also means “spider”, which may take its meaning from “rounded mass”.

Entry added on 06.06.13

KUNI (国)

(n.)  country, earth, home, home country, land, region

Compare

  • kin “family, kind, race; kind, sort” < O.E. cynn  < P. Gmc. kunjam “family”
  • kind  “class, sort, variety” < O.E. gecynd  “kind, nature, race”
  • Dan., Swed. kön
  • Goth. kuni   “family, race”
  • O.E. cennan “beget, create”
  • O.Fris. kenn
  • O.H.G. chunni   “kin, race”
  • O.N. kyn
  • O.S. kunni
  • king  “ruler” < possibly O.E. cynn  “family, race”

MAJI (蠱)

MA.DI   (HT 3, 69, 85, 97, 118)

MA-DI  ► (KN As 603+, Db 1168+)

(adj.) charmed and cursed

(n.) something that bewilders, leads one astray; the work of demons

Compare

  • PIE *magh “to have power”
  • magic “the art of using hidden natural forces” < O.F. magique < Late L. magice “magic, sorcery”
  • mage “magician” < L. magus “magician”
  • MA.DI > MA-DI (KN As 603+, Db1168+)  Μηδίς (Medis) “a Median woman” >  MA-DI-QO (KN B 806, Dl 930, Dv 1460)  Μηδικός (Medikos) “the Median affairs” or μαγικός (magikos) “fit for the Magians; magical”

Notes:  An ancient name for Iran is Media, and its people were called Medes or the Medians [“Medes”].  As the Magi, the Medes were followers of pre-Zoroastrian Mazdaism [Magi”] and practiced the medical arts, for which Iran became known [“Ancient”].  Consequently, medicine and magic are confounded in MA-DI-QO: Μηδικός and μαγικός.  Medea, a devote of Hecate, was among the greatest sorceresses in Greek mythology.  The myth explains how her son, Medus, became the king of the country that would eventually be called Media [“Medea”].

KOFUN (古墳)

(n.) ancient burial mound,  tomb

Compare

  • It. cafano, Sp. cuebano  “basket”
  • coffer <  O.Fr. cofre  “chest” < L. cophinus  “basket”
  • coffin < O. Fr cofin 
Kurgan is the most obvious one old tumulus

Archaec Gaelic word for sea is muir = cognate for umi sea in Japanese??

ur ‘fire’ (french ‘fir’) = hi

MIRU (見)

(v.)  to look at, to see, to view

Compare

  • miracle < L.  miraculum  “object of wonder” < mirari   “to wonder at”  < mirus  “wonderful”
  • mirage < Fr. se mirer  “to be reflected” < V.L. mirare
  • mirror <  O.Fr. mireor < mirer  “look at”  < V.L. *mirare <  L. mirari  “to wonder at,  admire” <  L. admirari “to wonder at”

Notes:  Compare, also, the homophonic words sea and see.  The Japanese kanji for see (見) is also included in one spelling for the sea (綿津見). Compare IE words that are related to the sea, possibly for its reflective aspect: L. mare, mari;  Est. meri; Fr. mer;  Ger. meer.

 

YASHI (野師)

(n.) charlatan, faker, quack

Compare

  • Gr. ἴασις (iasis) “healing, healing mode, remedy”
  • Gr. ἰατρός (iatros) “one who heals, physician”

Note: LinB pa-ki-ja-si (PY Un 2 et al.) does not appear to have a complete Greek translation.  However, assuming a compound word, the second word appears to be the Greek ἴασις.  Moreover, compare pa-ki-ja-si with the Japanese fukiyashi (see the phonetic key).  Fuki is the Japanese name for the butterbur (Petasites hybridus), which the ancient Greeks used when treating multiple ailments that included gastrointestinal complaints, headaches, inflammation, and lung diseases [“Butterbur”].  Consequently, in LinB context, pa-ki-ja-si as fukiyashi, or, perhaps, fuki-iasis, may refer to a clan name that arose from its association with healing.  At the moment, however, there appears to be no modern equivalent to this name.

Reference:

  1. Butterbur (Petasites hybridus). Natural Standard. com.  Ret. on 12.10.12.

Entry added on 10 Dec 2012

_________________________

MIRU is a kun reading; see KEN for a related on reading.

::::::::::::::::::::::::
A branch off of the Indo-Hittite-European/Aryan languages,

Root of Jinn, Jinni, Jina, Jain is the Japanese word “jin” which in modern day parlance is equated with “person”, “people”, and written with the Chinese character “ren”. However, its original designation and meaning in prehistoric times probably came from the same root as the Arabic and Indo-european jinn and Jaina.
Originally came about as applied to the people who believed in jinn or jinni. Eg., jina or Jain.
Jinn are most associated with the beliefs and folklore of the Arabs, Persians, Syrians and Turks Meriam-Webster dictionary
Jin njin also found among variants if word for ren people (hakka and variants of Fukiennese)
Mongol temujin jin here means blacksmith or suffix for girls.
The word Jainism is derived from the Sanskrit verb root jin (“to conquer”). It refers to a battle with the passions and bodily pleasures that the Jain ascetics undertake. Those who win this battle are termed as Jina (conqueror). The term Jaina is therefore used to refer to laymen and ascetics of this tradition alike
 
Ashi is also a divinity in the Zoroastrian hierarchy of yazatas.
Jin – Person, People … Nihon jin Wajin … a reference to Japanese
Jinja the place to which the soirit of the deity is summoned
Ashi is also a divinity in the Zoroastrian hierarchy of yazatas.

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