Hokki Shrine: For a goddess who turned into a bird

Throughout Eurasia, many deities, royals and heroes turn into birds, according to folktales and myths, likely a tradition, a euphemistic way of saying someone had passed on, and in part, due to the millennia-long shamanic beliefs that the soul is transported to the Other World by a bird spirit (alternatively horses, dragons and dragon-horses) …

San'in Monogatari

Although the tale of Kaka-no-Kukedo, the birthplace of the primary deity of Sada Shrine, is a more riveting tale, I included another Izumo-no-Kuni Fudoki legend in this story. The Fudoki (like 8th century encyclopedias of Japan) in part set out to determine names for all the major geographical features of the country, which included assigning fortuitous kanji (Chinese written characters) for them. Quite often, the names they chose required some mythological background.

This is case, a village derived its name from a little bird.

Read about this bird’s role in Japanese culture here.

The Cettia diphone, clumsily translated as the Japanese Bush Warbler or Japanese nightingale, is simpler to refer to as the known here as uguisu (鶯). In ancient times, it used to be called a houki-dori, a Houki bird (法吉鳥). The legend states that Umugi-hime (sometimes known as Umuka-hime while her sister Kisagai-hime is…

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